A Practical, Holistic Approach to Stress & Wellness in a High Pressure World

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Nadia E. Haddad, MD, MS
Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
April 14, 2016

Stress is an undeniable aspect of modern life. Though everyone experiences and responds to stress in an individual way, stress is defined as physical and psychological pressure that causes a disturbance in your body’s natural equilibrium. It’s actually an important short-term adaptive response for meeting natural threats: The stress response prepares the body to fight or flight, a protective mechanism that could save your life.

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Apr 24th, 2016

Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease: Past, Present, Future

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Melanie Lising, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology and Neurological Sciences
and
Laurice Yang, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology and Neurological Sciences
March 10, 2016

Deep brain stimulation has been used as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease for the last 25 years. Yet this modern medical therapy has roots in remedies used in first-century A.D. Rome.

In 46 A.D., a physician for the Roman emperor discovered that when people touched an electric ray, they would get intermittent relief from pain. “The physician would then put electric rays on patient’s heads and that’s how he treated headaches,” said Laurice Yang, MD, at a presentation for the Stanford Health Library on the past, present, and future of deep brain stimulation. “We have come a long way since then.”

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Mar 22nd, 2016

Osteoporosis: Prevention and Treatment

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Joy Wu, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor, Medicine (Endocrinology)
February 25, 2016

Most people are aware that as they age, their bones aren’t as strong as when they were young. But many don’t realize how common osteoporosis is.

“A pretty significant proportion of the American population has some degree of bone loss,” said Joy Wu, MD, PhD, at a presentation for the Stanford Health Library. “Half of all women over 50 are going to have a fracture from osteoporosis.” Men have a lower but not insignificant lifetime risk of about 20 percent, she said.

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Mar 7th, 2016

Understanding Bipolar Depression

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Shefali Miller, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
February 11, 2016

Bipolar depression is an illness of recurring mood swings from the low of depression to the high of mania. It is commonly misdiagnosed as unipolar depression (major depressive disorder), says Shefali Miller, MD, because the first symptoms often occur from a major depressive episode.

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Mar 3rd, 2016

Sleep Like a Baby: Myths About Insomnia and Aging

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Donn Posner, PhD
Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
January 28, 2016

Two of the widespread myths about insomnia are that babies get the best sleep—and aging people get the worst. But Donn Posner, PhD, says sleep doesn’t have to be lousy in older people.

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Feb 11th, 2016

The Masquerading Headache:Chronic Daily Migraine, Positional Headache, POTS, or Spinal Fluid Leak? Why It Hurts When You Stand Up

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Ian Carroll, MD, MS
Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology
January 14, 2016

People who are suffering severe recurring headaches, neck pain, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, ringing in the ears, diffuse pain, fatigue, or brain fog may have a fixable condition that frequently goes unrecognized. The key to the diagnosis is recognizing that these symptoms get worse the longer the person is upright.

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Jan 25th, 2016

Psychology of Pain: Opening the Medicine Box In Your Mind

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Beth Darnall, PhD
Clinical Associate Professor of Anesthesia
November 5, 2015

More than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, making it the country’s leading public health problem. But part of the difficulty of dealing with pain is that it’s not just a physical concern, and everyone experiences it differently.

“Pain in the body is processed in the brain, which is where psychology fits in,” said Beth Darnall, PhD, a clinical associate professor of anesthesiology, perioperative, and pain medicine, who spoke at a presentation sponsored by the Stanford Health Library. “Clearly there’s a connection.”

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Nov 9th, 2015
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