Runner Injuries: Update on Treatment and Prevention

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Michael Fredericson, MD
Professor, Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine
September 23, 2014

Because of the repetitive overload, running can lead to several common injuries to the foot, hips, and knees. Michael Fredericson, MD, a professor of orthopedic surgery and director of the Stanford Runners Injury Clinic, discussed the most common runners’ problems and scientifically based treatments at a presentation sponsored by Stanford Hospital Health Library. His lecture focused on what he referred to as the “Big Six.”
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Oct 29th, 2014

Preventing or Delaying Type 2 Diabetes

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Bryant Lin, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine – General Medicine Disciplines
Stanford University Medical Center
October 2, 2014

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One in four U.S. people is prediabetic. That means they have a tripled risk of developing diabetes. There are ways to stop that from happening, and Bryant Lin, MD, is spreading the word.

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Oct 14th, 2014

Cancer Survivorship: A Role for Integrative Medicine

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Sue Kim, MD, MS
Integrative Medicine Specialist
September 18, 2014

More than 80 million Americans use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) every year. CAM refers to a number of health care therapies, practices, and products that do not typically fall within the paradigm of conventional Western medicine—such as acupuncture, mindfulness meditation, massage, and botanicals. “Complementary” medicine refers to the use of these therapies in conjunction with conventional medicine, while “alternative” medicine denotes the use of these therapies instead of Western medicine.

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Oct 14th, 2014

Advancing the Standard of Care for Prostate Cancer

Posted By SHL Librarian

Introduction: Eila Skinner, MD
Chair of the Department of Urology
Stanford University Medical Center
September 6, 2014
Sheraton Hotel, Palo Alto

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Prostate cancer tends to be relatively slow-growing, which means that it typically takes a number of years to become large enough to be detected and even longer to spread beyond the prostate. It’s still extremely serious and the second most-common cause of cancer deaths in U.S. men (lung cancer is first). And because the prostate is close to several vital organs, prostate cancer and its treatment can disrupt normal urinary, bowel, and sexual function.

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Oct 13th, 2014

Mental Health Improvement Through Early Detection and Intervention

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Steven Adelsheim, MD
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Stanford University Medical Center
June 5, 2014

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Psychosis is a serious mental disorder that causes thinking and emotions to become so impaired that the person loses contact with reality and the ability to function in ordinary life. Psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and conditions like clinical depression, anxiety, and bipolar disease remain some of medicine’s deepest mysteries—and some of its most misunderstood.

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Jun 24th, 2014

Update on Stroke

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Greg Albers, MD
Director, Stanford Stroke Center
May 15, 2014

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About 780,000 Americans suffer from a stroke each year—someone every 45 seconds. It’s the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. but the greatest cause of long-term disability. Most people do not die from a stroke but its effects cause more than half of all neurologic hospitalizations. The direct and indirect costs from lost work and lost productivity are enormous.

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May 26th, 2014

Diagnosing and Treating Cataracts

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Artis Montague, MD, PhD
Clinical Associate Professor, Opthalmology
Stanford University Medical Center
May 1, 2014

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Cataracts are the most common cause of vision loss in people over age 40. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. Each year, 3 million Americans have their cataracts removed.

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May 2nd, 2014
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