Healthful Properties of Spices

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Alison Ryan, MS, RD, CSO, CNSC
Registered Dietician
Stanford University Medical Center
March 27, 2014

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Spicing your food is one of the easiest ways to enhance flavor without adding calories, sodium, or fat, But it’s not only your waistline that can benefit from the addition of herbs and spices. Herbs and spices have been shown to provide numerous health benefits—from boosting immunity to controlling blood sugar, aiding digestion, lowering blood pressure, and easing joint pain.

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Apr 1st, 2014

Bowed Legs, Knock Knees and Pigeon Toes in Children: What’s Normal and What’s Not

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Jeffrey Young, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopedic Surgery
Stanford University Medical Center
March 20, 2014

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For many children, growth of the lower limbs does not always follow the straight and narrow. Children can have temporary deformities like bowlegs, knock knees, in-toeing (pigeon toes), and out-toeing, especially in their early years. Continue Reading »

Mar 27th, 2014

Management of Chronic Rhinosinusitis

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Jennifer Y. Lee, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Otolaryngology
Stanford University Medical Center
March 13, 2014

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Chronic rhinosinusitis is an inflammatory disease associated with infection and allergy in the nasal cavity and sinuses—the holes in the face and skull. It is one of the most common diseases in the United States, affecting about 15 percent of the population and costing more than $8 billion in lost work days and productivity.

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Mar 26th, 2014

Non-Pharmalogic Treatment of Pain

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Ravi Prasad, PhD
Clinical Associate Professor of Anesthesia
February 27, 2014

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The pain that comes from hitting a finger with a hammer or touching a hot stove serves an important purpose, warning our bodies to respond to danger. But for more than 100 million adult Americans, the pain never seems to go away.

Chronic pain affects more Americans than diabetes, heart disease, and cancer combined. It is one of the largest causes of disability in the United States, costing greater than $500 billion each year in lost productivity and health care treatment.

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Mar 4th, 2014

Pelvic Pain

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Jennifer Hah, MD, MS
Instructor, Division of Pain Medicine
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
Stanford University Medical Center
February 20, 2014

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Because the pelvis is such a large and complex area, pelvic pain can be diffuse and difficult to isolate. It can remain localized at its source, or it can interact with the other organs crowded within the lower abdomen, including the bladder, colon, and reproductive organs.

Pain is caused when visceral nerves in the pelvis, which are usually silent,  are activated. Visceral pain is usually poorly localized and often described as a vague discomfort. These nerves can interact with somatic nerves and the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. Continue Reading »

Mar 3rd, 2014

Hearing, Hearing Loss, and Current Technology

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Gerald R. Popelka, PhD
Chief, Division of Audiology
Professor of Otolaryngology/ Head and Neck Surgery
February 20, 2014

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While hearing loss can have a variety of causes, including infection and some medications, its most prevalent cause is the simple act of aging. About 18 percent of the entire U.S. population are Baby Boomers—some 57 million people—who are now turning 60, and more of the population will continue to thrive and remain active until well into their 80s. Hearing usually holds steady until about age 50, starts to drop by age 60, and takes a more significant drop between age 70 and 80.

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Mar 3rd, 2014
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