Psychology of Pain: Opening the Medicine Box In Your Mind

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Beth Darnall, PhD
Clinical Associate Professor of Anesthesia
November 5, 2015

More than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, making it the country’s leading public health problem. But part of the difficulty of dealing with pain is that it’s not just a physical concern, and everyone experiences it differently.

“Pain in the body is processed in the brain, which is where psychology fits in,” said Beth Darnall, PhD, a clinical associate professor of anesthesiology, perioperative, and pain medicine, who spoke at a presentation sponsored by the Stanford Health Library. “Clearly there’s a connection.”

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Nov 9th, 2015

Understanding Migraine: A Patient Guide

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Meredith Barad, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesia
October 22, 2015

Migraine headaches are the most common type of headache, affecting 13 percent of all Americans. It’s the most prevalent health issue in the United States, affecting 36 million people—more cases than diabetes, cancer, and heart disease. Women are three times more likely to suffer from migraine than men, and the incidence in women seems to be associated with hormonal changes such as menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause.

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Nov 5th, 2015

Huntington’s Disease: Stages And Therapies

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Presented by: Veronica Santini, MD, MA
Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology and Neurological Sciences
October 1, 2015

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a hereditary disease causing progressive degeneration of nerve cells in the brain characterized as a movement disorder, a cognitive disorder, and a neuropsychiatric disorder. Its most notable physical symptom is a dancelike, involuntary movement called chorea, though it also can cause tics, muscle jerks, abnormal eye movements, difficulty swallowing, inability to maintain muscle contractions, and impaired gait and balance. It also leads to cognitive impairment with slowed processing speed, poor concentration, impulsiveness, and lack of insight. Many people with HD suffer from depression, anxiety, irritability, and apathy, which can often lead to social isolation. There is a significantly increased risk of suicide in this population.

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Oct 14th, 2015

Update on Multiple Sclerosis

Posted By SHL Librarian

Speaker: Christopher Lock, MD
Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology and Neurological Sciences
September 24, 2015

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease in which the immune system attacks the protective myelin sheath that covers and insulates the nerves and nerve fibers. Myelin damage disrupts communication between the brain’s neurons and between the brain and body and can damage the axons of the nerve cells. The damaged myelin forms scar tissue (sclerosis), causing nerve impulses traveling to and from the brain and spinal cord to become distorted or interrupted, which can lead to symptoms ranging from numbness and tingling to weakness, vertigo, pain, and speech, gait, and vision problems. Disease activity continues even when there are no symptoms. The process can continue to deteriorate the cells irreversibly.

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Oct 4th, 2015

Finding Familial Hypercholesterolemia Before You Know You Have It

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by:  Joshua Knowles, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor, Cardiovascular Medicine
June 11, 2015

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited disorder that causes extremely high levels of LDL (low density lipoprotein or “bad” cholesterol), and no amount of diet or exercise can bring the numbers down. If not treated, these LDL levels can build up in the arteries and lead to heart attacks at an early age.

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Jul 10th, 2015

Innovative Treatments for Tendonopathy

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Eugene Roh, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopedic Surgery
May 28, 2015

Tendons are bands of thick connective tissue that attach muscle to bone that can expand and push into the nerve when they become overused. The tendons act as a sort of spring, storing energy for movement. Tendonopathy is an umbrella term for the inflammation or irritation of a tendon, which causes pain and tenderness just outside a joint. When the condition is acute and short-term, it is referred to as tendinitis; when the pain continues for more than three months, it is considered chronic and is known as tendinosis.

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Jul 1st, 2015

The Fog of Concussion

Posted By SHL Librarian

Presented by: Jamshid Ghajar, MD, PhD
Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery
Director, Stanford Concussion and Brain Performance Center
May 14, 2015

While most people think they know what a concussion is, in reality there is no universally accepted scientific definition, and both diagnosis and treatment vary from physician to physician. The condition is elusive as well—a traumatic brain injury that alters the way the brain functions, with a range of symptoms that can vary in intensity and duration. Its effects can include headaches and problems with concentration, memory, balance, and coordination. Brain scans, using magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography, often show no physiological change even though the person may be acting “not quite right.”

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Jun 1st, 2015
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